Map of Early Modern London

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About the Map of Early Modern London: 

The Map of Early Modern London is an online resource comprised of four separate but overlapping projects. The first project is a map interface of London created by Ralph Agas around 1561. This map is widely referred to as the “Agas map.” According to the website, this Graphical User Interface (GUI) “allows us to visualize literary and historical data.” The second project is an encyclopedia comprised of the places, people, organizations, topics, and terms associated with London in the early modern era. The third project is a library of the primary source texts used to build this site, excluding the work of John Stow. The fourth project is a forthcoming, versioned text of John Stowe’s A Survey of London.

How to Navigate MoEML: 

The Map: If you need a visual representation of early modern London to assist you with your research, this map interface is a handy tool. This may be particularly useful if you are unsure of a research topic and want to “explore” 16th-century London.

– Click “The Map” on the MoEML’s homepage.

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– This will bring you to a GUI of the “Agas map.”

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– You can click on any of these squares to zoom in and get a clearer view of the map.

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– Red stars indicate locations that are identified and described in the encyclopedia project. Yellow stars indicate important locations with incomplete encyclopedia entries.

 

The Encyclopedia:  If you’re researching a specific place, person, organization, topic, or term from early modern London, you can search for information in the encyclopedia.

– Click “Encyclopedia” on the MoEML’s homepage.

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– From here, you can choose to search for information by placeography, personography, orgography, topics, or terms. 

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– If searching under placeography, you will also be given a point on the “Agas map” to search for your term.

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– If you’re not sure where to look or would like a shortcut to find the information you’re seeking, you can use the search bar at the top of the webpage.

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– Hit “Go!” to find results or conduct an advanced search. For an advanced search, you can choose where to search for the term you’ve entered, choose to ignore the s/ſ  distinction, show variant spellings, etc. As you’ll see below, you can deselect every box but “Encyclopedia” if that’s where you are searching. 

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– Search results will appear under the advanced search box. 

The Library:  The primary texts used for this project are available in the library section, but they are limited and more difficult to use.

– Click “Library” on the MoEML’s homepage.

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– The library can be difficult to navigate because it does not provide a search bar or a way to narrow texts. You must choose from a category listed below and scroll through each result to find the text you’re looking for.

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– Therefore, it may be faster to search for a text using the search bar mentioned in the encyclopedia section. You can simply deselect all boxes except for “Primary sources” to search within the library.

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–  If you’re researching a specific place, person, organization, topic, or term from early modern London, you can search for information in the encyclopedia.

 

Stow:  Currently, John Stow’s A Survey of London is being transcribed by the MoEML team. However, information on Stow and his survey are available at this time.

– Click “Stow” on the MoEML’s homepage.

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– Here, you’ll find information about plans to encode various editions of John Stow’s A Survey of London. 

– Scroll down to “Articles on Stow” to read either a biography on Stow or an explanation of the survey, which contained information about London in the year 1598.

– You can also read select portions of the survey under “Stow Extracts.”

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